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The lessons from COVID-19

Shaking the world by its hinges, the COVID-19 pandemic has opened our eyes to the cruelty we have been subjecting to the green earth for decades. This year on April 22, celebrating the 50th Earth Day, the absence of rallies, peace protests, or planting new trees, taught us something we had never anticipated. We stayed in our homes and polluted less. We shouted less and conserved more. This Earth Day became a message that nature doesn’t need humans to protect itself. No, it is us, human beings, who need protection, who need safety, who will die when deprived of the basic necessities of life, and who are dependent on nature to journey us towards a good life.

 

The canals of Italy are running clean, the sky has become fog-free and smoke-free in New Delhi, India, the birds, and the bees are thriving with life, the mountains are clear and are standing tall with pride, the animals have at last come out of their cages, and are running free, their freedom has made us feel what we have been depriving them for so long. This pandemic has given us time to think over our actions and their repercussions. It has virtualised the need for creating a better economy, better health, and medical assistance, and it has highlighted one of the most important things: the need for education and literacy.

 

David Crossley, Ph.D., professor of geophysics in the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at Saint Louis University, describes the changes and effects of COVID-19 as something truly magical. He highlighted the air quality and how much it has changed within weeks, literally. Even the climate activist Greta Thunberg pointed out how inefficient the world is for not taking into account the long-term risks associated with the outbreak and how we can do better.

 

This pandemic has everything and everyone into something better, if not the best. Although the immediate effects of this disease are saddening and heart-breaking, it has still taught us more than we could ever understand in a thousand years.

 

Dibyasha Das