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Microbes in water is a very natural process

microbes in water

Microbes exist in the entire world in each substance we see. They are a part of all the natural processes in some way or the other.

All the microbes are not hazardous for our health, but what about the wrong ones thriving in nature?

In the present time, when everyone is concerned about COVID-19, we also need to think about life after the COVID.

The present health crisis has changed the human lifestyle throughout the world. People have vacated buildings for months and that has helped the microbes grow in the relatively still sitting water supplies.

The stagnation of water for such long times creates a warm environment for microbes to grow. It also decays the disinfectants added to limit their growth in water.

When the wrong ones become prominent inside pipelines, which can be hazardous for human life, it creates a problem.

 

Challenges put forth by microbes

The professors of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Northeastern University are researching the existence of harmful microbes in pipelines.

They say that normally 10,000 to 50,000 microbes exist in every millimetre of drinking water. When this contamination grows over the stagnation of hours or days, the engineers flush out water from the plumbing system.

However, when stagnation occurs for such long times, it becomes a very big problem to prevent contamination.

The plumbing systems are complex networks of pipes that consist of several designs and metals. It’s not easy to generalize such complex structures.

Also, the metal of pipes began to corrode sometimes. Corrosion can create a higher level of contamination. The gradual repopulation of people in those buildings amidst such a situation can put people to risk.

 

Related: The lessons from COVID-19

 

The contamination of municipal water supply at Walkerton, Ontario, Canada in 2000 sickened 2000 people and killed seven.

Similarly, Cryptosporidium contamination of the drinking water in Milwaukee, Wisconsin in 1993 sickened more than 400,000 people and killed forty-seven.

Such past incidents are really shocking. The global population already hit hard by the pandemic needs to be very careful towards the health and plan for the new normal.

 

Manshi Chauhan